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ESS1.A: The Universe and Its Stars

What is the universe, and what goes on in stars?


Introduction to ESS1.A

from A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas (pages 173-174)

The sun is but one of a vast number of stars in the Milky Way galaxy, which is one of a vast number of galaxies in the universe. 

The universe began with a period of extreme and rapid expansion known as the Big Bang, which occurred about 13.7 billion years ago. This theory is supported by the fact that it provides explanation of observations of distant galaxies receding from our own, of the measured composition of stars and nonstellar gases, and of the maps and spectra of the primordial radiation (cosmic microwave background) that still fills the universe. 

Nearly all observable matter in the universe is hydrogen or helium, which formed in the first minutes after the Big Bang. Elements other than these remnants of the Big Bang continue to form within the cores of stars. Nuclear fusion within stars produces all atomic nuclei lighter than and including iron, and the process releases the energy seen as starlight. Heavier elements are produced when certain massive stars achieve a supernova stage and explode. 

Stars’ radiation of visible light and other forms of energy can be measured and studied to develop explanations about the formation, age, and composition of the universe. Stars go through a sequence of developmental stages—they are formed; evolve in size, mass, and brightness; and eventually burn out. Material from earlier stars that exploded as supernovas is recycled to form younger stars and their planetary systems. The sun is a medium-sized star about halfway through its predicted life span of about 10 billion years. 


K-12 Progressions

from NGSS Appendix E: Disciplinary Core Idea Progressions

K-2 3-5 6-8 9-12
ESS1.A
The Universe and its Stars

Patterns of movement of the sun, moon, and stars as seen from Earth can be observed, described, and predicted. ESS1.A

Stars range greatly in size and distance from Earth and this can explain their relative brightness. ESS1.A

The solar system is part of the Milky Way, which is one of many billions of galaxies. ESS1.A

Light spectra from stars are used to determine their characteristics, processes, and lifecycles. Solar activity creates the elements through nuclear fusion, and short-term solar variations cause space weather and insolation changes that significantly affect humanity. The development of technologies has provided the astronomical data that provide the empirical evidence for the Big Bang theory. ESS1.A


Grade Band Endpoints for ESS1.A

from A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas (page 174)

By the end of grade 2. Patterns of the motion of the sun, moon, and stars in the sky can be observed, described, and predicted. At night one can see the light coming from many stars with the naked eye, but telescopes make it possible to see many more and to observe them and the moon and planets in greater detail. 

By the end of grade 5. The sun is a star that appears larger and brighter than other stars because it is closer. Stars range greatly in their size and distance from Earth. 

By the end of grade 8. Patterns of the apparent motion of the sun, the moon, and stars in the sky can be observed, described, predicted, and explained with models. The universe began with a period of extreme and rapid expansion known as the Big Bang. Earth and its solar system are part of the Milky Way galaxy, which is one of many galaxies in the universe. 

By the end of grade 12. The star called the sun is changing and will burn out over a life span of approximately 10 billion years. The sun is just one of more than 200 billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy, and the Milky Way is just one of hundreds of billions of galaxies in the universe. The study of stars’ light spectra and brightness is used to identify compositional elements of stars, their movements, and their distances from Earth. 


Performance Expectations Associated with ESS1.A

K-2 3-5 6-8 9-12
1-ESS1-1
5-ESS1-1 MS-ESS1-1
MS-ESS1-2
HS-ESS1-1
HS-ESS1-2
HS-ESS1-3


Additional Resources

A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas (pages 173-174)

Bozemanscience Video

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