Region 9 Summit

October 25-26, 2018

San Diego, California

Focus on Oceans and Climate Change

San Diego Environmental Summit Participants

Resources Developed

Grade, Grade Level, Course Performance Expectations Phenomenon Region
Grade 3 3-LS4-3, 3-LS4-4 Albatross can die from eating plastic. 9
Grade 5 5-LS2-1 During extreme weather events, species are found off the California coast that are not normally present. 9
Grade 3 3-ESS2-1, 3-ESS2-2 It rains more in the mountains than at the beach. 9
High School HS-LS2-4, HS-PS3-1 Phytoplankton thrive at the ocean surface in Coastal California Ocean, but not at the surface of the open ocean. 9
Grade 6 Integrated MS-ESS2-5, MS-ESS2-6 Plastic duckies have been found floating in the ocean around the world. 9
High School HS-ESS2-2, HS-ESS3-5 Precipitation in California if variable from year to year. 9
Grade 5 5-LS2-1, 5-ESS3-1 Removal of sea otters from the kelp forest ecosystem may result in an urchin barrens. 9
High School HS-LS2-2, HS-LS2-4 Salp blooms disrupt food webs. 9
Grade 3 3-LS4-4 Sea lion pups are stranded on land in California. 9
Grade 7 Integrated MS-LS2-1, MS-LS2-2, MS-LS2-4 Sea lions are appearing stranded and disoriented on shorelines in Southern California. 9
High School HS-LS2-2, HS-LS2-6 Sea lions are being found disoriented and stranded on the shoreline in Southern California. 9
Grade 6 Integrated MS-ESS2-4, MS-ESS2-5 Some years in San Diego it rains more than in other years. 9
Grade 7 Integrated MS-LS2-1, MS-LS2-3, MS-LS2-4 The number and variety of sportfish species increased during the 2015-2016 fishing season off the coast of Southern California. 9
High School Chemistry in the Earth System HS-LS2-7, HS-ESS3-4 The size of most plastic in the great pacific garbage patch is smaller that 1cm2. 9

Summit Lead Educators, Scientists, and Community Experts

Jenni Brandon

Jenni Brandon

Jenni Brandon recently finished her PhD in Biological Oceanography at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD. Both her graduate and undergraduate research focused on ways humans negatively alter our world’s ecosystems. Her PhD research was on marine debris, specifically marine microplastics and how they affect North Pacific Ocean ecosystems. She developed better ways to quantify and identify the smallest microplastics in the ocean, and looked for microplastic ingestion inside plankton at the base of the food web. Through her studies on pollution, she gained an understanding of the dire need for better communication and education to the public about such pressing issues. She is passionate about spending her post-PhD career communicating and advocating for science; to that end she is now doing a postdoctoral fellowship at Birch Aquarium at Scripps, focusing on science outreach and communication.

 

Megan Hepner

Megan Hepner

Megan has a Masters of Science in Marine Science and a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science and Policy. Megan worked at the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries as a contracted Research Assistant. She became well versed in the research studies being conducted in sanctuaries, including the chief pressures on marine resources, the research required to strengthen sanctuaries Science Needs Assessments, and new and innovative technologies being used to conduct research. Her breadth of knowledge on the sanctuaries marine resources led me to work as a graduate assistant on the Marine Biodiversity Observation Network (MBON). Megan has since applied her knowledge of marine resource management and the Magnuson-Stevens Act to help design a model that indicates the status and trends of biodiversity and environmental variables in a sanctuary to improve our capacity for science-based decision-making. Currently, Megan is the Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System (SCCOOS) Program Coordinator, where she works to help collect, integrate, and deliver coastal and ocean observations in order to improve safety, enhance the economy, and protect the environment.

 

Elizabeth Hetherington

Elizabeth Hetherington

Liz was born and raised in New York City. She earned a B.S. in Marine Biology from the College of Charleston. After college, Liz taught high school chemistry in New York and then moved to San Diego, where she interned at Southwest Fisheries Science Center. Here, Liz developed her research interest in marine food webs and feeding interactions between species. In 2010, Liz began graduate school at the University of San Diego, where she received my M.S. in Marine and Environmental Science and worked on an project with the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission focused on food web dynamics in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Liz then went to UC San Diego for her PhD in Ecology and in 2019 will begin a postdoctoral research position at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Her research is broadly focused in marine ecology, where Liz answers questions about the diets of different organisms (from plankton to fish, turtles, and whales), their roles in marine food webs, and why this information is important for understanding ecosystem functioning and protecting marine resources.

 

Julie Kalansky

Julie Kalansky

Julie Kalanksy is a climate researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. She is also the operations manager for the Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes and the the program Manager for CNAP, the California Nevada Application Program. Julie’s research interests stem from trying to understand weather and climate in order to better prepare for extreme events and future conditions. These efforts include using historical observations to understand historical weather variability in the Western US and the impacts associated with this variability as well as future projections of climate variability. She is actively involved with the California 4th Climate Assessment  with a focus in sea level projections and the regional application of the information that is coming out of the effort. Julie engages with regional stakeholders to better understand how this climate and weather information can be applied in decision making.

 

Katherine Zaba

Katherine Zaba

Currently a Postdoctoral Scholar at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO), Katherine is a physical oceanographer whose research focus is the structure and variability of the California Current System. She is an SIO alumna, having recently defended her Ph.D. in August 2018. Prior to graduate school, Katherine worked as a Physical Sciences Analyst at Applied Operations Research, Inc. in Solana Beach, CA and as an Undergraduate Student Researcher for Theiss Research’s Zanzibar Project in Zanzibar, Tanzania. She obtained two Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degrees – one in Applied Mathematics and the second in Atmospheric, Oceanic and Environmental Sciences – from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in 2010.

 

Kimberly Allard

Kimberly Allard

Kimberly Allard is a TK-5 science enrichment teacher at both Vista Grande and Tierrasanta Elementary in San Diego Unified School District. She has been teaching for 19 years and the last 12 of those years have been in science education. Kimberly holds a multiple subject teaching credential, a single subject credential in general science, and a Master’s in Curriculum and Instruction from San Diego State University. A prime focus for student learning in her classroom is to connect to Earth, the environment, and to instill a sense of stewardship for the future.

 

Michelle Armenta

Michelle Armenta

Michelle Armenta obtained her master’s degree in Cross Cultural Teaching and is currently pursuing her doctoral degree in Educational Leadership. Michelle Armenta is an Education Specialist serving students in grades kindergarten through second grade in Vista Unified School District. Before teaching special education, Michelle was a general education teacher. She has been teaching elementary students for twelve years. Currently, she serves on her site’s leadership team representing the special education department. In addition, she is a Core Teacher Leader with the Next Generation Science Standards Early Implementers. She joined the NGSS team as a teacher leader to ensure that all students engage in three-dimensional science education.

 

Ann Baldridge

Ann Baldridge

Ann is the Program Manager at the Resource Conservation District of Greater San Diego (RCD). She has been with the RCD for 6 years and develops and oversees the organization’s education and gardening programs.

The RCD’s core education program focuses on watershed health. Ann and her team provide in-class, hands-on presentations to elementary school students that teach about watersheds, how our waterways become polluted, and what individuals can do to make a difference.  She has also developed and delivered school garden training programs for educators, and is working on rolling out new environmental stewardship programs for high school students. Ann strongly believes that the natural world provides an ideal setting for learning. Giving kids the tools and space to explore is a great way to bring classroom concepts to life and to foster a sense of connection to the environment.

Ann has a BA in Psychology from UC Davis and a Master’s degree in Environmental Psychology from the University of Surrey (UK). Environmental Psychology focuses on the person-place connection – how our surroundings influence us, and how we in turn interact with the world around us. It is proven that the natural environment has many positive effects on humans, but we as citizens need to take action to protect it! Learning about and interacting with nature can help students appreciate the world around them and understand the positive impacts they can make.

 


William Bishop

William Bishop

Bill received his Bachelor of Science in Cell Physiology from the University of Arizona. Prior to teaching he worked as a Consumer Safety Officer with the US Food and Drug Administration promoting and protecting public health here in San Diego, working at the Otay Mesa Port of Entry. Bill received my teaching credential from San Diego State University, and is currently completing coursework towards my Masters in Math and Science Education. Bill has taught Biology, Chemistry, and Physics at Madison High School. He is a lifelong advocate for the environment, born and raised in New Jersey, and has seen the impact of human influenced climate change has had on the barrier islands and coastal wetlands of his home state. Environmental science literacy is critically important if humans are going to understand the changes necessary to ensure the safety of our planet and species.

 

Shelley Glenn Lee

Shelley Glenn Lee

Shelley Glenn Lee has been a science educator in San Diego County for more than 20 years, having worked at Birch Aquarium at Scripps, the San Diego Natural History Museum, UC San Diego, and High Tech High. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology and a Masters degree in Science Education, both from San Diego State University.  She currently teaches Science at High Tech Elementary North County (K-5.) In this project-based setting, Shelley connects and collaborates with community partners to engage students in local ecology and environmental science. Her students have worked on native bees and invasive ants with researchers at UCSD, conducted biological surveys and published books for Cabrillo National Monument, studied tidepools and held teaching exhibitions at Birch Aquarium, and worked as citizen scientists with several local parks and conservancies. Shelley was recognized by the EPA in 2017 as a recipient of a Presidential Innovation Award for Environmental Educators. She is on the Board of Directors for the San Dieguito River Valley Conservancy and the Education Advisory Committee of the Escondido Creek Conservancy.

 

Shawna Jaggi

 

Kim Klinko

Kim Klinko

Kim currently teaches 7th and 8th grade science at Tierra del Sol Middle School in Lakeside, CA.  Originally from Chicago, she moved to San Diego in order to enjoy the outdoors. This is Kim’s eighth year teaching. She has a Masters in Teaching and became interested in environmental education while working toward her second Masters degree in Biology at Miami University, Project Dragonfly.  The Global Field Program (GFP) brings master’s degree candidates, scientists, educators, community leaders, and others together at conservation hotspots in Africa, Asia, Australia, and the Americas for firsthand experience with inquiry-driven education, environmental stewardship, and global understanding.  

“If we are going to save environmentalism and the environment, we must also save an endangered indicator species: the child in nature.”

― Richard Louv, Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder

 

Kari Koch

Kari Koch

Kari Koch is a 6th grade science teacher at Tierra del Sol Middle School in Lakeside, California. She has been teaching middle school for 22 years. Kari graduated with a BA in Exercise Science in 1997 from Fort Lewis College in Durango Colorado. In 2012, she  earned a Masters of Teaching degree with emphasis on Educational Technology from National University. Kari is also a NOYCE Master Teaching Fellow through San Diego State University’s Project LEARN. Kari hopes to lead students through experiences that will shape their future and make them better inhabitants of the Earth.

“Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, Nothing is going to get better. It's not.”

― Dr. Seuss, The Lorax

 

Jennifer McCluan

Jennifer McCluan

Jennifer McCluan has been fortunate to learn and teach with students in middle school, high school, and college science classes throughout the country as a Navy spouse.  Jennifer earned a Bachelor's degree in Chemistry from Rollins College and a Master's in Science Education from Wake Forest University. Her interest in environmental education began in junior high school, where she attend Springdale High School in Pennsylvania, across the street from Rachel Carson's homestead, and picked up a copy of Silent Spring.  Jennifer's experiences during undergraduate study abroad programs in the Dominican Republic led to an interest in water quality in rural communities, which she infused into her science classrooms upon embarking in a career in science education.  She now serves as San Dieguito Union High School District's Science Teacher on Special Assignment, and supports 7th - 12th grade science teachers through their district's NGSS transition.

 

Jon Pierce

Jon Pierce

Jon is a physics teacher at Mira Mesa High School in the San Diego Unified School District. He is in his fifth year as a science educator. Jon has a B.S. in Economics from the University of Mary Washington (VA), and obtained his teaching credential from SDSU with a focus on Geosciences and Physics. Jon has a passion for inspiring enthusiasm for science in students through engaging lessons and experiences. In addition, he strive to promote scientific and environmental literacy so that his students can make informed decisions regarding their future and the future of our planet.

 

Andrea Pino Antl

Andrea Pino Antl

Andrea Pino Antl is a High School Biology Teacher and Department Chair at the San Diego School of Creative and Performing Arts in San Diego Unified School District. She graduated from Point Loma Nazarene University with a Bachelor Degree in Liberal Studies and a Masters of Arts Degree in Teaching and Learning. Her passion for the environment began as a child from gardening with my Grandma and long camping trips in the Eastern Sierra Nevadas with her family. Her goal as an educator is to spread knowledge of the environment to her students to improve their ability to make choices about our quickly changing world.

 

Rachel Poland

Rachel Poland

Rachel has a BA in Marine Biology and in BA Environmental Studies. She has a MEd Curriculum and Instruction. Rachel has put her education to use in her 20 Years of teaching 6th through 8th grade. Throughout the years she has supported environmental education by serving for several summers as Nature Director at a BSA Camp, serving as an interpretive ranger in Yosemite National Park, acting as the teacher liaison for 4 years for the Girls in Science Program with the San Diego Zoo and spending several summers sharing conservation information by leading tours at the San Diego Zoo.

 

Rachael Tarshes

Rachael Tarshes

Rachael Tarshes has a bachelors in Biology and a Masters in Secondary Teaching. She is also a National Board Certified Teacher in Early Adolescence/Science. She  taught in Seattle, New York City, Australia and China before landing in San Diego in 2008. She has taught high school biology and chemistry, middle school grades 7 and 8 and is now a TK-5 Science Enrichment teacher at an elementary site in San Diego Unified. While earning her doctorate in Instructional Leadership, Rachael started an environmental education program at her site where the teachers moved beyond just teaching about saving the planet in April and established a schoolwide recycling program and lessons focused on climate change, global warming, and human impacts. While new at her current site, she has plans to establish a campus garden and develop environmental literacy units for the elementary level.

 

Dave Tupper

Dave Tupper

Dave Tupper is the NGSS Early Implementation Initiative Project Director for Lakeside Union School District, an SDSU NOYCE Master Teacher Fellow, and currently serves on the Board of the Lakeside River Park Conservancy. Dave is a former elementary and middle school science teacher, and currently teaches secondary science methods courses at SDSU. Prior to his current position as a TOSA, he most recently worked as a 7th Grade science teacher at Tierra del Sol Middle School in Lakeside, as well as being the Project Director for a California Math Science Partnership Grant servicing three districts near Lakeside. Additionally, Dave served on the 2015 California Framework Content Committee for the California Science Framework .

 

Ann Wegmann